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Inspired by Magna Carta as an example of people organising to change the balance of power, Our Great Charter is using the 800th anniversary to educate and equip young adults with learning disabilities to overcome their own experience of disempowerment.

The group from Skillnet, an East Kent social enterprise, will ran an interactive installation at The Beaney museum in Canterbury from Saturday 13 June to Sunday 28 June. Learners from Skillnet studied Magna Carta and how to apply it to tackling today’s inequalities.

The project encompasses a powerful 18-week study programme with visits to Parliament, Canterbury Cathedral (running until 23rd July) and local councils, and a two-week interactive public installation at Canterbury’s Beaney museum. Through the installation and using social media, learners will engage the public in creating a new Charter for today, stating afresh how power should be shared. Taking Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury of the time and prime organiser of Magna Carta, as a role model, learners will be motivated and mobilised to be just as active today for equality.

During an 18-week course called Great Citizens, learners are studying who has power and how it is used, in the past and today. This features visits to Parliament, Kent County Council, Canterbury City Council and Canterbury Cathedral. Click here for more information about Great Citizens.

The installation, timed for the 800th anniversary, showcased Magna Carta to the public, who were invited to visit and be inspired by sound, images and activities to help create the new Charter. For more information, visit, www.skillnetgroup.co.uk/ourgreatcharter.

Contact information:
For information on the Beaney installation, Our Great Charter, contact Steve Perry on 07966 017597 or at [email protected]
For information on the Magna Carta study programme, Great Citizens, contact Candy Worf on 07421 745521 or at [email protected]

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